KVS
© Mitchel Raphael

Building feminist cities - an intersectional approach to mobility

Europalia, deBuren, Rhea (VUB) & KVS
EUROPALIA TRAINS & TRACKS
Thu 10.03.2022 19:00 - 21:00
KVS, Brussels
KVS TOP
Past event
10.03.2022
19:00 - 21:00
Past event

Our cities, including stations and mobility concepts, are mainly designed by and for men. Little consideration is given to people with disabilities and women, whether in their role as mothers, workers, or carers. Women often feel unsafe and avoid certain routes, times, and modes of transport. What should a more inclusive city and urban mobility look like?

'Public space is not designed for women. My fear is not irrational. Headphones on - don't talk to me. City space is my space. The city needs to hear my voice.'

Feminist city: a field guide - Leslie Kern

The Canadian geographer, Leslie Kern, will give a lecture on intersectionality and mobility. In her book Feminist City, Claiming Space in a Man-made world, Kern explains from an historical perspective and personal experience that social inequalities are built into our cities: in the design of mobility, neighbourhoods, and buildings. Kern argues that a feminist city is not only defined and designed by women. It is a city where differences in gender, origin and physical limitations do not (or no longer) create inequality and where all users feel safe, seen, understood, and recognized.

After her lecture, Nahid Shaikh will talk to Leslie Kern, architect Apolline Vranken, urban planner Eva Kailand critic and curator René Boer (Failed Architecture platform). During the discussion, we will zoom in on urban projects that serve as examples and take a critical look at European cities such as Brussels, Vienna, and Amsterdam.

Is part of the selection:
English please

Extra

Practical information
Leslie Kern and Eva Kail will participate via a video call.
This event is sold out, get on the waiting list
here.

LIVESTREAM Building feminist cities - an intersectional approach to mobility

Our cities, including stations and mobility concepts, are mainly designed by and for men. Little consideration is given to people with disabilities and women, whether in their role as mothers, workers…

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